Upcoming Lecture: Genetics and African Prehistory: Possibilities and Challenges

Genetics and African Prehistory: Possibilities and Challenges
Speaker: Scott MacEachern, Bowdoin College
April 10, 2014, 6pm
Business Administration Building, C Wing, Room 116 (BAC 116)

There has been less archaeology done in Africa than on any other continent, and the prehistory of much of this vast continent remains more or less unknown. Historical genetics provides us with a new and extremely powerful way of looking at population movements and contacts in the past, and the comparison of archaeological and genetic data offers the prospects of immense improvement in our understanding of African prehistory. At the same time, there are dangers involved in such interdisciplinary undertakings: archaeological and genetic data offer insights into different aspects of human history, and each approach has its own strengths and weaknesses. In particular, genetics can reinforce assumptions that African populations are ‘people without history’, remnants of humanity’s past. This lecture will offer a discussion of these issues, with examples drawn from the Lake Chad Basin and other parts of the continent.

Scott MacEachern is Professor of Anthropology at Bowdoin College. He holds his degrees from the University of Prince Edward Island and the University of Calgary (M.A. and Ph.D. in Archaeology), and his areas of specialization are African archaeology, ethnoarchaeology, state formation processes, and archaeology and genetics. He has conducted fieldwork in Cameroon, Chad, Nigeria, Kenya and Ghana, as well as a number of sites in Canada, and is Director of the DGB Archaeological Project in Northern Cameroon. He has published extensively, and has been the recipient of many grants and fellowships.

For a printable PDF parking map for this lecture, click here: Parking Map

For a printable PDF flyer for this lecture, click here: MacEachern Flyer

Upcoming Lecture: Cops and Robbers, Egyptian Style: Police Work in Ptolemaic Egypt

Cops and Robbers, Egyptian Style: Police Work in Ptolemaic Egypt
Speaker: John Bauschatz, University of Arizona
March 20, 2014, 6pm
Business Administration Building, C Wing, Room 116 (BAC 116)

Throughout the nearly 300 years of Ptolemaic rule in Egypt (330–30 B.C.), victims of crime in all areas of the Egyptian countryside called upon local police officials to investigate crimes, hold trials and arrest, question and sometimes even imprison wrongdoers. In this lecture I will examine the evidence for four of the main areas of police activity—arrest, investigation, detention and resolution—via case studies. As will become clear over the course of the lecture, the police system in place to tend to the needs of Egyptian villagers was efficient, effective and largely independent of central government controls.

John Bauschatz received his BA in Classics from Brown University in 1997, and his PhD from Duke University in 2005. He has taught in the Classics Departments at Duke and Swarthmore College, and has been an Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Arizona since 2007. When not prepping for the introductory ancient Greek courses he teaches regularly for the Classics Department, you can find him reading up on crime in antiquity or trying to fill in the holes in pieces of ancient Egyptian papyrus. He lives in Tucson with his wife and three small children, and enjoys a pun once in a while.

This lecture is our third annual partnership with the Arizona chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt!

For a printable PDF parking map for this lecture, click here: Parking Map

For a printable PDF flyer for this lecture, click here: Bauschatz Flyer

Upcoming Lecture: Towards a Geometric Perfection: the Arts and Crafts of Early Greece

Towards a Geometric Perfection: the Arts and Crafts of Early Greece
Speaker: Irene Lemos, Oxford University
February 13, 2014, 6pm
Business Administration Building, C Wing, Room 116 (BAC 116)

This lecture will look at the work of the craftsmen and artists of the period from 1200 to 700 BCE. Though Mycenaean architecture and art have been greatly admired and the Archaic and Classical Greek monuments, ceramics, and sculpture are well known and discussed, the achievements of the early Greek artists and craftsmen are less acknowledged and often even ignored.

In the lecture Professor Lemos will explore the ceramics, personal ornaments, tools, and buildings of the period and argue that the early Greek craftsmen and artists achieved and accomplished a lot during a period when much social and cultural change took place. Indeed, their skills and achievements pioneered the perception of what is considered to be Greek art.

Irene Lemos is Professor of Classics at Oxford University and has been the Director of excavations and publications at Lefkandi in Euboea, Greece since 2002. She has authored and edited a plethora of books, articles and other publications on the archaeology and art of early Greece from 1200-500BCE, most recently Ancient Greece. From the Mycenaean Palaces to the Age of Homer, Edinburgh University Press 2006.

This is the AIA’s Kress Lecture for 2013-2014

For a printable PDF flyer for this lecture, click here: Lemos Flyer

For a printable PDF parking map for this lecture, click here: Parking Map